‘Comcast’s worst nightmare: How Tennessee could save America’s Internet’

The business lobby often demands that government get out of the way of private corporations, so that competition can flourish and high-quality services can be efficiently delivered to as many consumers as possible. Yet, in an epic fight over telecommunications policy, the paradigm is now being flipped on its head, with corporate forces demanding the government squelch competition and halt the expansion of those high-quality services. Whether and how federal officials act may ultimately shape the future of America’s information economy. — More at Salon.

Can you name all four Beatles? Top pro golfers can’t

As the senior member of the PGA.com production team, I feel like I’m not surprised at much anymore. But I was surprised today.

ESPN asked several of the game’s top golfers if they could name all four members of the Beatles, who of course came to fame right there in Liverpool, just down the road from where the Open Championship is being played this week. — More.

Russia Today London correspondent resigns in protest at ‘disrespect for facts’ over Malaysian plane crash

Firth described the Malaysia Airlines flight crash coverage as “the straw that broke the camel’s back for me” and handed in her resignation this morning.

Russia Today has been criticised for suggesting the crash is the fault of Ukraine. Most other media outlets have suggested that a more likely explanation is that pro-Russian separatists were responsible for shooting down the passenger jet. So far it is estimated that around 300 people died in the crash. — More.

Like many, I’m drawn to this tragic story, both emotionally and as a former journalist. She appears to have shown great courage in taking a stand.

Brutal, blunt piece on the future of newspapers, or the lack thereof

For an industry built on a foundation of truth-telling, the newspaper business sure has trouble telling the truth about itself.

Last month at the World Newspaper Congress in Turin, Italy, the chief spokesperson for U.S.-based dailies, Newspaper Association of America President Caroline Little, gave publishers, editors and educators from around the world a presentation on “the current state of newspaper media in the United States.”

Little’s PowerPoint show was a work of art. With her palette of selective statistics, context-less trend statements and stock photos of smiling, young news consumers, she painted an uplifting masterpiece worthy of the Italian master Botticelli. His cherubic angels were Little’s news-hungry Millennials; his dancing nymphs were her nimble publishers.More.